Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

Lost your job? What you need to do now

January 18, 2009

Unemployment has been rising steadily for the last 6 months as the global financial crisis deepens. Many white-collar professionals have been laid off including management, sales staff and office workers. 

So what can you do if you have lost your job? 

  • Use all the information and help that your company will give you to improve your chances of re-employment. Take any courses you can that they will pay for and use the work time you have left to its best advantage. 
     
  • Update your resume – you may need to include more detail about aspects of other jobs you have had to broaden your appeal in the market
     
  • Cut back on expenses and look at your budget
     
  • Use the time to think about what you really want to do for a job. Maybe this is your chance to move into something new?  
     
  • Try to stay positive – there are jobs and it is not personal. Your skills can be used elsewhere, you just might have to be flexible in what you do and for how long. 
     
  • Actively search for work opportunitiesget a profile on LinkedIn or other social networks and see what is out there. Many jobs are not advertised, but if you know someone who can submit your resume, you might just find something. 
     
  • Remember temp agencies if you have office skills. Many companies may lay off staff and then find themselves without key people. They will use temp agencies to fill the gap instead of employing staff. You may be in a different place every week, but many people also find fulltime work after being placed with a company. 
     
  • Consider being a contractor or self-employed. You can offer a daily rate making it easier for companies to afford you short term. 

Global Layoffs: Safest and riskiest jobs in 2009

January 18, 2009

My contract has been brought to an early halt by the global economy altering my company’s share price. So I am joining the list of those people looking for work.

Is your job safe? A new report shows what the safest and riskiest jobs are in 2009. 

Safest jobs include: Biotechnology, Online Information Services, Online shopping and surprisingly, waste disposal!

Risky jobs include: Car retailing, real estate, investment banking and bricklaying

Happiness at work: We can all make a difference

July 1, 2008

There is a growing army of people trying to change the way we work, and the message is getting louder.
If more of us concentrate on improving our working lives instead of moaning about them, then companies will change.

“Be the change you want to see in the world” – Mahatma Gandhi

Today I am recommending the Happy at Work Manifesto by Alexander Kjerulf http://www.changethis.com/36.04.HappyatWork

It contains 25 points on how you can change your work life to make it happier. I agree with all of them.
One of my favourites is

21: Happiness at work ain’t rocket science.
The things that are necessary to make me happy at work are really simple and can easily be brought into almost any workplace. Recognition. A positive attitude. Learning and growing. Sharing decisions. Openness.

You can also check out Alexander’s blog at http://positivesharing.com/ 

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How to Enjoy Your Job Video by the author, Joanna Penn

June 29, 2008

This is a short video of me discussing my book, “How to Enjoy Your Job”. It explains why I wrote it and why I think it is important for people to enjoy work. I am passionate about helping people change their working lives, and this video gives you an insight into how to book can help that.

You can get a free chapter and e-workbook http://howtoenjoyyourjob.com/index.php?page=free-workbook.
You can also buy the book from my website http://howtoenjoyyourjob.com/index.php?page=buy-the-book or from Amazon.com or BN.com

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Just Means: Jobs for people who create change

June 26, 2008

 

In order to make change happen in the workplace, companies and individuals need to shift their ideas about what work is, and what a job entails.

One company that is trying to enable this change is http://www.justmeans.com/

 

Why is Just Means important?

The goal of JustMeans is to question the assumptions behind how we have traditionally thought of value.  Both how organizations create value and also what we value in our lives.  Our goal is to showcase the organizations, ideas, people, and collaborations that are shaping the future of business.  In providing a platform where thousands of individuals and companies trade knowledge, we hope to exponentially lower the transaction cost of doing business in the world of social responsibility.  Only then will we be able to create the sustainable future and lives that so many of us want.

We call JustMeans the trading floor for social responsibility.  In the old days, trading floors were established to drive down the transaction costs of trading commodities and equities.  Lower transaction costs meant that more deals could be done, more goods traded.  Back then, value was defined by a price.  Today, it is as well, but there is much behind that price.  If you create a $0.79 pork burrito, does that price accurately reflect the externalities on the environment, labor, or our health care system?  In our own neighborhood in Harlem, 125th street is lined with every fast food restaurant where a full meal can be bought for $5.    As Amartya Sen has pointed out, the average longevity of a resident of certain poor neighborhoods in New York is lower than that of an average citizen in Bangladesh.

 

What are the main types of jobs on your site?

JustMeans is different from other platform in that we believe that you can create change in all three sectors (non-profit, for-profit and government).   Companies that use JustMeans to find talent include entrepreneurial non-profit organizations, clean technology firms, socially responsible venture capital firms, Fortune 100 companies, small to medium growing businesses, and development project management positions.   Most people that use JustMeans have a real skillset, like marketing, finance, or engineering and are looking to implement that skillset to help grow a business or department.

 

Why did you start Just Means? 

After studying economics at the University of Chicago, I was concerned about the lack of focus on externalities/public goods in the curriculum.   Value was defined by short term financial gain and this definition shaped my colleagues perception on the role of business in society.  A successful business was one that created short term financial value at all costs, a successful career was defined by the size of your paycheck. 

As a result, I created StartingBloc, a non-profit organization that educates, empowers and connects emerging leaders to drive positive social change across sectors.  The organization started with a $1,000 grant from the University of Chicago and I continued work on it for over four years.  The idea was to create a competitive leadership development program for undergraduates and young professionals.  In partnership with leading business schools, we showcased the people, organizations and models of change that were driving the fields of social enterprise and sustainability forward.    Running the organization was tremendously rewarding but I felt that we needed a place where these ideas could be showcased to many more people.

 

The companies that use your site include Timbaland, Jumpstart and MBAs without Borders. What do companies like these have in common? 

They all share an understanding that there are many groups that companies/organizations should be accountable to beyond just investors/donors.  These groups include current and potential employees, customers, vendors, suppliers, communities, journalists (both old and new), and the environment.

 

Do people who work for a meaningful purpose enjoy their jobs more than other people?

Yes.  I think this is just human nature.  People are inherently good.  If you are working on something that you are passionate about and also has a positive impact on the world, you are going to feel like you are an active participant in shaping your reality.  Paulo Freire, author of Pedagogy of the Oppressed, discusses how the lack of meaningful work is one form of oppression.  Through work, people become active participants in creating their world.  If you do not enjoy your work or find freedom through it, you are essentially oppressing yourself.

 

What is your number one tip for being fulfilled in your job?

Figure out what you are passionate about.  The money will follow.

 

If you are interested in finding out more, check out http://www.JustMeans.com

 

 

 

 

 

Did you just “fall” into your job?

June 18, 2008

A new survey by Galaxy Research in Australia shows that over 50% of workers “fell into” their jobs, and only 1 in 4 (25%) actively planned their career. http://www.smartcompany.com.au/Free-Articles/Trends/20080613-Were-not-happy-with-our-jobs.html

This is not just in Australia – it is a common theme across most Western countries.

How do you “fall into” a job?

I fell into business consulting as I needed a summer job that paid the most money to pay off my student loan. After that summer they offered me a fulltime position after I finished University. I woke up a few years later wondering how on earth I ended up doing it. I have a degree in Theology and yet I am a business and IT consultant through experience!

Can you get out of the job once you have years of experience in it?

Yes, you can!

It is a matter of changing your mindset and believing that you can be more than the job you are in now. One in three people in the Galaxy survey felt that their job didn’t accurately reflect who they are as a person. These people need to actively plan the next step in order to find work that does represent who they are. It takes time as you are likely to be reliant on the pay-cheque from your existing job, but you can escape your job and do something you love. You may have to volunteer for a while, or retrain, or do the work part time for free – but you can change what you do.People underestimate what they can achieve in 5 years. You may set a plan for a year but not for 5 – but think where you were 5 years ago? Haven’t you come a long way?

Set a goal now for 5 years time. Are you doing your ideal job then? What are you doing? Write it down. Dream it. Then set goals to achieve it.

 

‘Whatever the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve”. Napoleon Hill

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Social Networking: 8 ways to use it to get a job

June 15, 2008

Unemployment rates might be rising in some countries but there is always work out there for people who will apply themselves, be flexible and offer good value for their pay. Social networking is becoming more dominant as a force for change on the internet, so here are some tips for how to use it to get a job or extra work.

1)    Build your online profile with the intention of using it for work. If you build a page at LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/ or other sites, make sure it is professional enough to be used as a resume. Once you have loaded your job history, become friends with former colleagues and get recommended for previous work. If you are straight out of college, have a profile anyway as it makes you look serious about getting work. If you have a blog or a separate website, make sure it is professional. Google yourself and see what comes up. You can direct potential employers to this information in your paper resume if necessary.

 

2)    Keep your professional social networking separate from your personal.

Profiles have public and private settings. Sites like Facebook http://www.facebook.com may be for your friends and other sites might be your professional look, but both come up on search engines. Make sure you separate the two as professionalism still counts online.
  
 

 

3)    Get friendly with recruiters. Many recruitment firms now have profiles on social networking sites like LinkedIn. Find recruitment agencies in your area of expertise and become friends with them. You can say that you are looking for work, and the recruiters will often post on the site with jobs.

 

4)    Use job blogs and networks to improve your resume and skills. There is so much information online that you can use to improve your chances to get a job. Check out sites that help you improve your resume or interview skills, or those that recommend new job search sites.   

 

5)    Keep an eye on company blogs or press releases. Smaller, more tech savvy companies are using online press releases, blogs or their own social networks for recruitment. If people have joined their RSS feed, or signed up for their newsletter, that person is likely to have an interest in their services and may be looking for work. So become a joiner for those companies/groups you are interested in working for, and keep an eye out for work opportunities. If you become an active part of these communities, you could even ask the group if there are jobs available.

 

6)    Work remotely. With fuel prices rocketing, if you can work from home as a freelancer, you have the chance to work for anyone in the world. Elance http://www.elance.com is a site that connects people looking for work to be done, and those who can perform it. People submit projects, and then companies/individuals submit bids on the project. Payment is through the site by credit card, Paypal or their escrow service. Providers are rated and you can discuss projects on private message boards. If you have skills that can be used remotely, this is a great place to start. Although it is not a social networking site, you can use your other networking profiles to direct people to your elance provider profile which shows your availability.

 

7)    Use Second Life. In May, the first virtual job fair was held on Second Life http://www.secondlife.com/ with big companies like Microsoft and Sodexho recruiting and avatars attending for discussions with recruiters.  http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20588553/ You can also drop into one of the virtual company headquarters and drop off your resume in Second Life. Virtual interviews are followed up on the phone or in person, so it might be an option for the tech-savvy person who can use their avatar professionally.

 

8)    Use sites to find people to approach in the real world. If you want to approach a specific company, but don’t know how to stand out from the pack of resumes, make sure you direct yours to the right person. Use social networks and blogs to find out who the best person to approach is, and then send them your resume directly. Many companies have this information online, and you will be able to find out more personal information from social networks.

 

 

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