Archive for the ‘Safety and Environment’ Category

Problems at work: I am being bullied or harassed

March 1, 2009

Abusive, threatening or humiliating treatment is unacceptable in the workplace, regardless of who the person is. There is a growing awareness of workplace bullying and harassment, but it doesn’t help the person affected unless it is reported and dealt with. Often, being treated this way can rob you of the power to act and may make you feel like you are not worth much anyway. If you feel put down, it can be hard to maintain a positive attitude and self image.

But this is not true. It is important to remember that you are worth more than this, and that you will not continue to allow bad treatment.  

What can you do about these situations?

 

You need to focus on the areas you can actually control as this is where you can make changes. It is difficult to change someone else’s behaviour. But you can alter your own behaviour by avoiding that person, refusing to engage with them and not reacting to situations. You can also report them through the appropriate channels if the problem is serious.

What can you control about the situation you are facing? What is within your power to change?

You have the following options:

·         Talk to the person involved. Ask them about their behaviour and involve a third party as a witness if you are uncomfortable with this. Put it in writing if you like, but make your feelings known. However, this is easier said than done as many of us avoid conflict and painful situations.

·         Don’t respond in kind. You will keep a stronger position if you do not resort to tactics that put you in the same category as the other person. It can actually be more powerful and disarming to be positive and kind to the other person and demonstrate that you are not bothered by them. By reacting, you give them power over you.

·         If you are not sure how serious the situation is, or if you just want to know your options, you can talk to someone else in your HR department. Be careful to make the situation hypothetical so as not to jeopardise your position, especially if the person involved is senior. You can also try talking to friends, Employee Assistance programs, use anonymous phone help-lines or go online for support. It is important to discuss the situation with somebody as you will feel more stressed if you don’t have emotional support.  

·         If the situation is serious, report the person to your direct manager or HR manager. This will involve talking about the details as making a complaint like this can be a serious move, so take any emails, or notes on situations that have happened. You need to be calm and rational and not overly emotional in your approach. Find out whether anyone else has been treated in this same way. It is likely that this person has behaved in the same way before which will help your case. Before you give any details, make sure the conversation will be kept confidential.

·         You always have the option to leave this position or the job entirely. If things are very bad at work, it is better to walk away than continue to be subjected to a situation that will wear you down with stress and anxiety. The majority of work situations are not like this, so move on and you will find somewhere more to your liking. You may need time to evaluate your options and look for different work, but this may be the best option.

 

What are the three steps you will take to address your situation at work? 

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Holidays: New study shows Australians are not taking them

January 10, 2009

A new study by Tourism Australia has shown that people are not taking their annual leave, but working instead.Close to 60% of full-time workers did not use their 4 weeks holiday, citing “workplace issues” and “personal issues” as reasons why. 

Stockpiling annual leave has an effect on people’s performance and workplace happiness as well as the company bottom line. The study is aimed at turning this missing leave into Australian holidays to boost the tourism industry, which should have a positive effect for everyone. 

“In the interests of workplace productivity as well as individuals’ mental refreshment and general health, it is important that annual leave be taken seriously by business.  During this time of skill shortages, employers who want to retain their talented workers increasingly need to be seen as employers of choice.

 “Employers who impose a culture of ‘work first at all costs’ are not investing in their people and will lose them to competitors who have a culture of looking after their human capital,” Jo Mithen, AHRI executive director said in the report.

Embrace fuel prices: Work from home

July 19, 2008

The media is filled with the rocketing oil prices at the moment. The jokes are starting to circulate on the net.
http://politicalhumor.about.com/od/currentevents/a/gasprices.htm

 People are starting to cut their car journeys. Airlines are going bust or adding more fuel surcharges to the bill. My flight just got cancelled for tomorrow because Qantas are laying off staff and economising. This seems all bad. But look on the bright side!

1. Volunteer to do a research project into how your organisation can reduce its carbon footprint and be more energy efficient. Work out how much fuel all employees would save if they worked from home one day per week. This does only work if you are in an office environment, but most jobs have admin tasks that can be left to one day per week. Use this to your advantage. Working from home is actually more productive, plus you get to see your family and get some exercise in as well.

2. Use Skype, webcams and e-meeting rooms for your interstate or international work. Save on the flight cost (financial and to the planet). This also saves your social and family life. Or at least tell your company that cutting down half of the commutes would be more economical. Many people say that travel is one of the most stressful things they do – physically and for their emotional life, so cutting it down would help everyone.

3. The lifestyle we are finally being forced to live is better for us now, and the future generations. We have been talking for so long about climate change, but now the economics are forcing behavioural change on us. We have less money in our pockets – but by changing our behaviour, we are benefiting the planet.

4. The above may make you think all greeny and leftie – but capitalism lives on in the carbon neutral future. With all the global economic crisis being touted, now is a great time to get in on the big sale of stocks/shares. Get educated in the green investment arena. Who will benefit from carbon credits, from the oil decline, from the move by governments to greener energy? In times of turbulence, money changes hands. Make sure some of it heads in your direction.
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